5 Awesome Stylized PC VR Games Will Make You Want To Develop Your Own.

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July 27, 2016GamingNo comments

You there! What are you doing? I bet it‘s not creating virtual reality PC games! Well, maybe you should be doing just that! VR is kind of at its infancy right now, and this flower has yet to reach full bloom. It‘s perfect time to get into the VR racket and produce a few games that would get you entry into the industry. And what the industry wants is stylized graphics and low polygon assets. Take a look at several examples of this wondrous approach.

Holopoint

Out of all the games we shall cover in this article, Holopoint looks the least stylized. It‘s almost approaching realism, which for VR still usually means 2002 PC graphics. However, those turn of the century visuals belie the core of a game that uses HTC Vive controllers to their fullest. You will break into sweat while milling around with your hands as you notch, draw and fire arrow after arrow at colorful cubes and glowing enemy infantrymen. Holopoint is the archery simulator to have! It‘s also a very basic looking game, with dojo that keeps refilling with gloving cubes and neon samurai. All in all, nothing too intensive as far as polygon counts are concerned, and nothing requiring in depth modeling. Basically, there‘s nothing that can not be achieved by buying stock 3D models.

I Expect You To Die

I Expect You To Die from Schell Games kicks it up a notch in the style department, as the whole game is represented in stylized cellshading that‘s playful and endearing to the eye. This game is a secret agent simulator and it‘s all about using the environment to escape a sticky situation, the kind that James Bond would get into. Oh those British agents… Anyway, as presented in the car demo level, you will pick up various items in the environment and either interact with them or use them on other items to escape certain doom. The purposefully unrealistic graphics solve several issues that would plague VR designers, not the least of which is detail and baking it into textures; the game‘s art style lets it dispense with that altogether. A masterful demonstration of working around constraints of the medium!

Job Simulator

Job Simulator takes stylization one step further and all the 3D items in the game look basically like cartoons, with simple textures liberally applied to simplistic in-game models. In this game, you get to work in a job simulator, which takes you to a futuristic, robot-empowered simulations of several spheres of employment that soon go awry – the critics and the users love it. The game manages to pack a lot creativity and interactivity, and that‘s all thanks to the processing resources saved on models. Now, it might be hard to buy just the kind of stylized stuff that you need for you dream game, but you should not stop from trying to achieve your dream.

Hover Junkers

Now this is probably one of the more active VR games out there. Hover Junkers is a multiplayer shooter where you (and maybe your friend) fly aboard a hovering junk boat (or a skiff, or a junk) and shoot at other players. You can also move to hide from incoming fire and maybe even partake in some blindfire exercises. Like we said, it‘s the busiest of the games, and it shows that VR games mustn‘t be constrained to a single standing position; though in this case, it‘s your position that‘s moving around instead of you. Anyways, it shows that fairly complex games can be achieved in VR with relatively simple graphics, and the industry wants to help you do it the best it can: game engines like Unreal Engine 4, Unity 5 and Cryengine are all free now, and you just need to take the on the challenge of reading through the documentation.

Keep Talking And Nobody Explodes

Keep Talking And Nobody Explodes is a fun VR party gams that people actually play in parties. It only needs one VR headset and even Samsung Gear VR will do in a pinch. The point is that one player dons the headset and goes on defuse the bomb. They do so by talking to the non-helmeted friends, who have a bomb defusal manual. So it‘s a cooperative game of describing a bomb as best as you can and your friends leafing through page upon page of manuals. Again, the visuals are quite simple, with the bomb being at the front and center, and the rest of the room appearing very sparse.

And there you have it, several VR projects that can be easily achieved via some application of elbow grease. As we have mentioned before, game engines are free of charge these days, and come with visual programing, which makes them even easier to use. Low polygon stock 3D models can be easily bought (or found for free). The idea is the real killer here, and the world of VR is waiting for yours.

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